What are SARMs and How do SARMs work?

SARMs have been developed to reduce complications resulting from the inhibition or systemic activation of these receptors. Because they are specific, they end up acting only in the place of interest: muscles and bones, for example. Because muscle hypertrophy is one of testosterone’s actions, these drugs are being tested for sarcopenia.

Sarcopenia is the muscle weakness caused by diseases such as cancer, burns or degenerative diseases. Another possible action of SARMs would be to block the progression of osteoporosis in older men and postmenopausal women. SARMs act on tissues through the same pathways as anabolic steroids.

However, because they are selective, studies suggest that theoretically they do not cause side effects on the prostate, skin, and hair. Another advantage in relation to testosterone or anabolic is that the SARM does not inhibit the hormonal axis and therefore does not lead to dependence.

Those who use anabolic steroids for long periods end up depending on the hormone replacement, as it gradually loses its ability to produce its own hormones. This occurs precisely because anabolics block the axis responsible for controlling the production of testosterone by the body.

Because testosterone is always high in testosterone replacement, the body signals that the glands no longer need to produce this hormone. In this way, they will atrophy and decrease their production of hormones. Because they did not interfere with the axis, the SARMs would not interfere with the production of the hormones.

SARMs and hair loss: studies

Theoretically the MRSAs do not act on the hair because they are selective. DHT is the major hormone associated with baldness or androgenetic alopecia. Regarding the association between SARM and hair loss, there are not enough scientific studies to be able to make a stand.